101 Long Term Care Statistics, Data & Facts [Updated for 2019]

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Long Term Care patient

If you are unsure about how to plan ahead for long-term care, you are in good company. While very wealthy individuals may assume that they can comfortably plan to pay for related costs with their own funds, the matter of rising healthcare costs and inflation must be reviewed carefully. Some well-off individuals may need to utilize Medicaid benefits as part of their long-term care plans.

For most individuals with middle-class income, including those who have amassed reasonable wealth through years of hard work and who are planning for a comfortable retirement, paying for long-term care becomes more challenging. Some people plan to pay for care expenses on their own, such as by selling their house if this type of care is needed. Others may purchase long-term care insurance. However, many long-term care insurance plans are expensive and may not provide the full benefits that people need. In addition, premium increases are common, and they may become unaffordable well before the insurance benefits are needed. An alternative is a hybrid life insurance policy that offers long-term care benefits, but this solution also has financial drawbacks.

Many Americans will require long-term care at some point in their lives. Given the high cost of care, you cannot afford to move forward without establishing a reasonable plan to pay for related expenses. There is not a plan that is universally appealing to everyone, so you must understand the situation and options fully before you can develop a plan that is well-suited for your needs and financial situation. Reviewing current long-term care statistics and facts may help you to determine the most strategic plan suitable for you.

Table of Contents

Long-Term Care Usage and Needs

1) 48%: Percentage of adults who are 65 years or older who will require long-term care for up to 12 months, 2018 – U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

2) 19%: Percentage of adults who are 65 years or older who will require long-term care for between 12 and 24 months, 2018 – U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

3) 21%: Percentage of adults who are 65 years or older who will require long-term care for between 2 and 4.9 years, 2018 – U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

4) 13%: Percentage of adults who are 65 years or older who will require long-term care for more than 5 years, 2018 – U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

5) 70%: Percentage of adults who are 65 years old who will require some level of long-term care throughout the rest of their life, 2018 – U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

6) 19 years, 3 months: The longest period of time a male has received long-term care, 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance Survey

7) 18 years, 1 month: The longest period of time a female has received long-term care, 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance Survey

8) 5.8 Million: The number of Americans currently living with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, 2019 – Alzheimer’s Association

9) 200,000: The number of Americans under the age of 65 who have been diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease, 2019 – Alzheimer’s Association

10) 5: The rank of Alzheimer’s disease for the overall cause of death among those who are 65 years or older, 2019 – Alzheimer’s Association

11) 6: The rank of Alzheimer’s disease for overall cause of death among all age groups, 2019 – Alzheimer’s Association

12) 4 to 8 Years: The amount of time an individual is expected to live after being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, 2019 – Alzheimer’s Association

13) 8,357,100: The number of people who receive long-term care from all sources, 2015 – CDC – Long-Term Care Services

14) 4,742,500: The number of people who receive long-term care from home health agencies, 2015 – CDC – Long-Term Care Services

15) 1,383,700: The number of people who receive long-term care in a nursing home, 2015 – CDC – Long-Term Care Services

16) 1,244,500: The number of people who receive hospice care, 2015 – CDC – Long-Term Care Services

17) 713,000: The number of people who live in a residential care community, 2015 – CDC – Long-Term Care Services

18) 273,200: The number of people who use adult day care service centers, 2015 – CDC – Long-Term Care Services

19) 63%: Percentage of people needing long-term care services who are 65 years old or older, 2003 – Long-Term Care Financing Project, Georgetown University Press

20) 37%: Percentage of people in need of long-term care services who are under the age of 65, 2003 – Long-Term Care Financing Project, Georgetown University Press

21) 68%: Probability of an individual who is 65 years old or older of becoming physically or cognitively impaired, 2003 – AARP

22) 27 Million: Estimated number of people who will pay for long-term care services by 2050, 2003 – U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and U.S. Department of Labor

23) 1 in 3: The number of seniors who pass away with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, 2019 – Alzheimer’s Association

24) Every 65 Seconds: The rate at which new patients are diagnosed with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease in the United States, 2019 – Alzheimer’s Association

25) 9 Hours: Average hours per day of assistance that an elderly adult with substantial physical and cognitive disabilities receives from both formal and information care sources, 2002 – Home Services Research

26) 11 Hours: Average hours per day of assistance that an elderly adult who is 85 years old or older with substantial physical and cognitive disabilities receives from both formal and informal care sources, 2002 – Home Services Research

27) 85 Years: Average life expectancy in the United States, 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance

health care costs

Long-Term Care Costs

28) $85,800: The median overall cost of nursing home services in the United States, 2018 – Genworth, AARP

29) $150,200: The median overall cost of nursing home services in Connecticut, which has the most expensive costs in the country, 2018 – Genworth, AARP

30) $54,800: The median overall cost of nursing home services in Texas, which as the least expensive costs in the country, 2018 – Genworth, AARP

31) $45,188: The median overall cost of home health services in the United States, 2018 – Genworth, AARP

32) 13%: Percentage of adults who will pay up to $50,000 in lifetime long-term care expenses out of their own pocket, 2018 – U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

33) 11%: Percentage of adults who will pay between $50,000 and $150,000 in lifetime long-term care expenses out of their own pocket, 2018 – U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

34) 13%: Percentage of adults who will pay at least $150,000 in lifetime long-term care expenses out of their own packet, 2018 – U.S. Department of Health and Human services

35) 1 in 4: The number of adults who are 45 years old or older who are financially unprepared for long-term care expenses, 2015 – AARP

36) $50,340: Average annual cost for a home healthcare provider, 2018 – Genworth

37) 1.51%: Annual percentage increase for the hourly rate for home healthcare services, 2018 – Genworth

38) $100.380: Average annual cost for a private patient room in a skilled nursing facility, 2018 – Genworth

39) 3.16%: Annual percentage increase for the cost of a private patient room in a skilled nursing facility, 2018 – Genworth

40) $89,292: Average annual cost for a semi-private patient room in a skilled nursing facility, 2018 – Genworth

41) 3.2%: Annual percentage increase for the cost of a semi-private patient room in a skilled nursing facility, 2016 – John Hancock Cost of Care Survey

42) $18,720: Average annual cost for adult daycare, 2018 – Genworth

43) 1.6%: Annual percentage increase for the annual cost of adult daycare expenses, 2016 – John Hancock Cost of Care Survey

44) $48,000: Average annual cost for assisted living facility care, 2018 – Genworth

45) 3.81%: Annual percentage increase for the annual cost of assisted living facility care, 2018 – Genworth

46) $2,276,381: The largest claim paid for a male patient, 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance Survey

47) $2,636,417: The largest claim paid for a female patient, 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance Survey

48) $290 Billion: The estimated cost to the United States for patients with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, 2019 – Alzheimer’s Association

49) $350,174: The average lifetime cost of care for an individual who has dementia, 2018 – Alzheimer’s Association

50) 70%: Percentage of long-term care costs that are absorbed by families, 2019 – Alzheimer’s Association

51) 18.2%: Percentage of long-term care expenses for the elderly that are used specifically for community-based services, 2000 – U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: Office of Disability, Aging and Long-Term Care Policy

caregiver with older lady

Long-Term Caregiving

52) 16 Million: The number of Americans who provide unpaid care to an individual with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, 2019 – Alzheimer’s Association

53) 27.3 Million: The number of family caregivers who care for an adult with a chronic illness or a disability, 2002 – American Association of Geriatric Psychiatry

54) 65.7 Million: The number of family and informal caregivers who provide care to an elderly, ill or disabled individual in the United States, 2015 – National Alliance for Caregiving, AARP

55) 52 Million: The number of caregivers who provide care for an adult who is at least 18 years old, 2015– J. Coughlin

56) 2 out of 3: The number of disabled individuals who receive long-term support services entirely from a family caregiver, 2015 – P. Doty, Public Policy and Aging Report

57) Two-Thirds: The number of elderly adults with a severe disability who receive all of their care from a family member, 2015 – National Health Interview Surveys on Disability by Health Policy Institute, Georgetown University

58) 18.5 Billion: The number of unpaid hours that caregivers provided to individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, 2019 – Alzheimer’s Association

59) $234 Billion: The estimated value of care that unpaid caregivers provided to those with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, 2019 – Alzheimer’s Association

60) 25%: Percentage of caregivers who care for children under the age of 18 years old and for a patient with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, 2019 – Alzheimer’s Association

61) $283,716: Average lifetime lost income and benefits for a male caregiver, 2015 – AARP

62) $324,044: Average lifetime lost income and benefits for a female caregiver, 2015 – AARP

63) 30%: Percentage of caregivers who are 65 years old or older and who are responsible for the long-term care of another elderly individual, 2015 – Long-Term Care Project

64) 15%: Percentage of adults who are between the ages of 45 and 54 years old who are responsible for the care of an elderly person, 2015 – Long-Term Care Project

65) 80%: Percentage of elderly adults requiring long-term care who live in a private home, 2015 – Congressional Budget Office

66) 63%: Percentage of caregivers who pay for care using their personal savings or retirement funds, 2018 – Genworth

67) 48%: Percentage of caregivers who reduced their quality of life to pay for care expenses, 2018 – Genworth

68) 29%: Percentage of caregivers who report increased care expenses since 2013, 2018 – Genworth

69) 53%: Percentage of caregivers whose stress level has increased as a result of providing care, 2018 – Genworth

70) 46%: Percentage of caregivers who believe their health and well-being has been negatively impacted by providing care, 2018 – Genworth

71) 41%: Percentage of caregivers who have experienced feelings of depression and resentment related to providing care, 2018 – Genworth

72) 40%: Percentage of caregivers who report that providing care has negatively impacted their relationship with their spouse or partner, 2018 – Genworth

National Capitol

Federal and State Funding for Long-Term Care

73) $195 Billion: The total estimated cost of Medicare and Medicaid payments that are associated with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, 2019 – Alzheimer’s Association

74) 7%: Percentage of people who receive Medicaid benefits for assisted living expenses, 2011 – AARP

75) 31.9%: Percentage of annual home care expenses that are paid for with Medicare funds, 2004 – National Association for Home Care

76) 18%: Percentage of annual home care expenses that are paid for with Medicaid funds, 2004 – National Association for Home Care

77) 55%: Percentage of long-term care funding from Medicaid that was used for institutional care, 2015 – SCAN Foundation

78) $16.4 Billion: Medicaid funds that are applied to long-term care expenses at home or through community-based service programs, 2002 – Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured

79) $83.8 Billion: Medicaid funds that are applied to long-term care expenses in all settings, 2004 – The Medstat Group

80) 57%: Percentage of Medicaid spending for adults who are 65 years old or older, 2000 – U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: Office of Disability, Aging and Long-Term Care Policy

insurance question

Long-Term Care Insurance

81) $2,050: The average annual premium for long-term care insurance for a 55-year-old male, 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance

82) $2,700: The average annual premium for long-term care insurance for a 55-year-old female, 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance

83) $3,050: The combined premium for long-term care insurance for a couple when both individuals are 55 years old, 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance

84) $1,925: The annual premium for a 60-year-old male with an initial pool of benefits equivalent to $164,000 and $386,500 when the insured is 85 years old, 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance

85) $3,050: The annual premium for a 60-year-old female with an initial pool of benefits equivalent to $164,000 and $386,500 when the insured is 85 years old, 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance

86) $3.040: The combined annual premium for long-term care insurance for a couple when both individuals are 60 years old and with an initial pool of benefits equivalent to $164,000 and $386,500 when the insured is 85 years old, 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance

87) $8,100: The combined annual premium for a hybrid insurance policy with life and long-term benefits for a 55-year-old couple, 2018 – Scott Olson

88) $13,800: The combined annual premium for a hybrid insurance policy with life and long-term benefits for a 65-year-old couple, 2018 – Scott Olson

89) 43%: Percentage of long-term care insurance benefits that are used for home care expenses, 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance

90) 13.5%: Percentage of long-term care insurance claims that end because benefits have been exhausted, January 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance

91) 72.5%: Percentage of long-term care insurance claims that end because of death, January 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance

92) 14% – Percentage of long-term care insurance claims that end because of recovery, January 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance

93) 43%: Percentage of long-term care insurance claims that ended in a home care setting, 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance

94) 29.5%: Percentage of long-term care insurance claims that ended in a nursing home facility, 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance

95) 26.5%: Percentage of long-term care insurance claims that ended in an assisted living facility, 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance

96) 64%: Percentage of long-term care insurance claims for female patients, January 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance

97) 29.3%: Percentage of long-term care insurance claims that begin before the patient is 81 years old, January 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance

98) 18%: Percentage of home care expenses that are paid for with private insurance or out-of-pocket, 2003 – National Association for Home Care

99) 44%: Percentage of applicants between the ages of 70 and 79 years old who are denied long-term care insurance coverage, January 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance

100) 30%: Percentage of applicants between the ages of 60 and 69 years old who are denied long-term care insurance coverage, January 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance

101) 42%: Percentage of applicants age 59 or younger who are denied long-term care insurance coverage, January 2019 – American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance

The Bottom Line

The high cost of long-term care services outside the home can be overwhelming and prohibitive. Because of this, many adults who need long-term care receive assistance at home from an unpaid caregiver, such as a family member. However, this can have a negative impact on the caregiver, including missed career opportunities, stress on personal relationships and a burden on their finances. While there is not a perfect solution that is right for everyone, it is clear that adults need to plan ahead for their potential long-term care needs. More than that, long-term care is often needed well before an adult reaches the age of 65 years old. With this in mind, long-term care planning requires prompt attention.